How to Speak English Fluently?

How to Speak English Fluently?

Fluency comes with practice. You cannot study every “How to speak English” book and
expect to be fluent in the language. Practice is a must! Also, if you think you read well
and so you must be fluent as well, you are mistaken! Reading and speaking are very
different.

The thing with leaning English is that you need not concentrate on the grammar while
speaking. Concentrate on conversing. English is a weird language with a lot of
loopholes.
Practice
Practicing speaking in English is a must. You cannot learn how to speak fluently
otherwise. The reason for this is the slang that has infiltrated the language and also the
utter lack of regard for grammatical rules while speaking. However, if one starts using
correct grammar, by the book, English would sound extremely weird.
Small talk
Learn how to begin a conversation. This will also grow your confidence. While
standing in line, ask the person in front or behind you a simple question such as ‘What
time is it?’ Try continuing with the conversation. If you have trouble understanding the
person, politely ask them to repeat what they said. Normally, people say “I’m sorry?”
but you could also say “Pardon”.
Confidence
Practicing English speech will require confidence. During a social gathering, start small
conversations. Do not hesitate to ask the person to repeat him or herself. If you do not
understand the meaning of a particular word or phrase, ask them to clarify. Chances are
they know you are in the learning process and would gladly help. Do not think that you
can go home and open Google translations and type in the word or phrase they used.
This does not work! Also, do not feel embarrassed when somebody corrects you. You
could also go to a karaoke bar!
Listen
Reading and speaking is not enough. Listen to how people speak, the pronunciations,
and the way words are use. Watch T.V., listen to songs etc. This way you are listening
to other people speak and observe how they pronounce the words.
Read books
Read novels. Concentrate on the formation of the sentences. Novels have dialogues, a
conversation between two people that you can use to your advantage. Notice how
people speak. They do not pay attention to the grammar as much as they do to talking.
Also, when you are reading, mark every unusual phrase or word and find out what it
means. Incorporate new words into your vocabulary.

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Four components essential to learning English

Four components essential to learning English

1. Phonetics
Phonetics is a branch related to sound. Phonology is a branch related to the systematic
organization of sounds in the English language.Phoneme is the smallest unit making up a
language. The English language consists of 41 phonemes. Phonemes combine to make up
words and syllables. According to Wikipedia a phoneme can be described as “The
smallest contrastive linguistic unit that may bring about a change of meaning”. Phonics is
the method of teaching people to recognize different sounds.
2. Reading fluency
Fluency is the ability to read and speak without stopping. This means not looking at each
word and trying to figure out how to read it. It should be accurate and precise.
3. Vocabulary development
Vocabulary is the body of words in any language. It is also the individual knowledge of
words and their meanings and pronunciations. It is important to develop your
vocabulary skills while learning a language. Of course, you are not expected to go
through a dictionary in one day; it is a slow process.
4. Oral skills
Oral skills are is your ability to speak a language fluently. This requires correct
pronunciations and the use of Grammar. Without development oral skills, learning a
language would be utterly useless.

 

Numeral in part of speech

Numeral in part of speech

Numeral is a part of speech that describes number of objects or their sequence when they are counted. Numerals have features of both nouns (answer the question ‘how many?’) and adjectives (answer the question ‘which?’). Accordingly, there are two types of numerals: cardinal and ordinal. They can be simple, derivative, complex, and fractional.

Example:

one, two, three (simple cardinal numerals); first, second, third, fifth (simple ordinal numerals); thirteen, twenty (derivative cardinal numerals); forty-seven, one hundred ninety-six (complex cardinal numerals); two thousand four hundred eighty-sixth (complex ordinal numeral); one third, two fifths, eight seventeenths = 1/3, 2/5, 8/17 (fractions).

 

Cardinal numerals

Cardinal numerals answer the question ‘how many?’. Numerals from ‘one’ to ‘twelve’, as well as ‘hundred, thousand, million, billion’, are fixed words. Numerals from 13 to 19 are derived from corresponding simple ones by adding the suffix -teen (some stems are modified): thirteen = 13; fourteen = 14; fifteen = 15; sixteen = 16; seventeen = 17; eighteen = 18; nineteen = 19. The numerals that are multiples of 10 are formed by addition of the suffix -ty to the number of tens, with occasional modifications: twenty = 20; thirty = 30; forty = 40; fifty = 50; sixty = 60; seventy = 70; eighty = 80; ninety = 90.

Complex numerals are formed by putting the first two described types together in order from left to right (tens and units are written with a hyphen). The words ‘hundred, thousand, million, billion’, etc., are always used in the singular form.

Example:

one hundred twenty-five = 125; five hundred seventy-two = 572; two thousand six hundred fifty-one = 2,651; three million four hundred ninety-six thousand seven hundred eighty-three = 3,496,783.

Ordinal numerals

Ordinal numerals

Ordinal numerals describe the order of countable objects. They answer the question ‘which?’. Usually, they are preceded by the definite article.

Example:

the first, the second, the third, the fourth, the fifth, the sixth, the seventh, the eighth, etc.

As you can see from the examples above, except for the first three numbers, English ordinal numerals are formed from the cardinal ones by addition of the suffix -th. In numerals ‘five’ and ‘twelve’ -ve is changed to -f: the fifth, the twelfth. In the numerals ‘eight, nine’ the last letter is dropped: the eighth, the ninth. In ordinal numerals that are multiples of 10 the last -y is changed to -ie: thirty + ‘th’ = thirtieth, fifty + ‘th’ = fiftieth, etc. In complex ordinal numerals only the last component is ordinal in form: two hundred eighty-seventh = 287th; one thousand five hundred sixty-first = 1561st; seventy-ninth = 79th.

Fractions

In the United States a point is used as decimal separator in writing: 1.5 = one point five or one and a half; 2.45 = two point forty-five or two point four five; 134.706 = one hundred thirty-four point seven ou six, etc.

Simple fractions are formed by two words: the nominator is cardinal number; the denominator is ordinal number.

Example:

6/7 = six sevenths; 2/5 = two fifths; 23/56 = twenty-three fifty-sixths; 1/2 = one half (this is an exception); 4 2/3 = four and two thirds. To designate percentage, the word ‘percent’ is used always in its singular form: 5% = five percent; 1% = one percent; 47% = forty-seven percent.

Dates

Dates

In American English the order in writing and reading dates is different from that in Europe. First comes month, then date, concluding with year. The date is an ordinal numeral, the year – a cardinal numeral read in a special way (see examples); the word ‘year’ is not used.

Example:

August 24th, 1995 (August twenty-fourth, nineteen ninety-five); June 2nd (June second); January 1st, 1934 (January first, nineteen thirty-four); November 11th, 1918 (November eleventh, nineteen eighteen). Decades are cardinal numerals in plural, used with the definite article: the 60s (the sixties); the 1920s (the nineteen twenties); the 1890s (the eighteen nineties).

 

 

Numeral in part of speech,Numeral,Fractions,Ordinal numerals,Cardinal numerals

Superlative degree

 

Superlative degree

One-syllable adjectives and adverbs, as well as the two-syllable ones ending in -er, -ow, -y, -le, form their superlative degree by addition of the suffix -est to their main (positive) form: long> longest; big> biggest (one-syllables with a short vowel double the last consonant); clever> cleverest; narrow> narrowest; happy> happiest (-y after a consonant changes to -i); simple> simplest (a mute -e is dropped). All other English adjectives and adverbs form their superlative degree by addition of the word ‘most’ or ‘least’.

Example:

sensitive> most sensitive; interesting> most interesting; difficult> most difficult; passive> least passive, etc.

When forming the superlative degree of English adjectives and adverbs, one has to remember the following exceptions from the rules stated above.

Exceptions:

good, well> best; bad, badly> worst; many (or ‘much’ for uncountable nouns)> most; little> least; far> farthest (distance) or furthest (distance or time); late> latest (time) or last (order); near> nearest (distance) or next (order); old> oldest (age) or eldest (seniority).

IELTS Listening Techniques and Skills

IELTS Listening Techniques and Skills Part 1

IELTS Listening Techniques and Skills for better listening.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRYKNOs4ztGsMj-p0HFegBQ

 

IELTS Listening Techniques and Skills Part 2

IELTS Listening Techniques and Skills part 2

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRYKNOs4ztGsMj-p0HFegBQ

 

IELTS Listening,IELTS Listening Techniques,free IELTS Listening videos, better listening in IELTS

 

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