60 IELTS speaking questions New

IELTS speaking questions by ieltsboss.com

IELTS speaking questions by ieltsboss.com

60 IELTS speaking questions New

IELTS speaking topics (new)
1. What is the meaning of your name?
2. Does your name affect your personality?
3. Tell me something about your hometown.
4. What are the differences in accent between your hometown and
Hanoi?
5. What is the character of the people like in your hometown?
6. What is people’s favourite food in the region where you live?
7. Do you think that people have enough time for leisure now?
8. Are there any historic monuments in your region?
9. Describe your Job? How do you spend your typical day?
10. Tell me something about the Hue Festival.
11. How have weddings changed in recent years?
12. Tell me something about the <Holi> Festival. <change with the
festival name of your country>
13. Describe a traditional wedding ceremony.
14. Name a person whom you admire? Why? What influence does he /
she has on your life? Would you like to become like him / her in future?
15. Are there any traditions concerning the birth of a baby?
16. How do you like <The test city> Compare it to your hometown.
How did you get to this place?
17. What place do you like best in Hanoi?
18. What places in Delhi should a foreigner visit?
19. What places would you recommend a visitor to go to in your
region/hometown?
20. If you had the choice, where would you choose to live in India?
21. Which parts of India would you recommend a foreigner to visit?
22. Tell me something about your family.
23. Which is your favourite colour?
24. Do you think colours influence our life? How?
25. Which is the best place you’ve been to in India?
26. Who does most of the household chores in your family?
27. Are the traditional sexual roles within the family changing?
28. Why is the divorce rate increasing so rapidly? Is it a problem?
29. What is your opinion of the planning family policy?
30. How do you discipline your child?
31. Is it acceptable for couples to live together without marrying?
32. If you had the choice, would you have a son or a daughter?
33. Are you going to bring your child up any differently to the way your
parents did?
34. What hopes do you have for your child? (if you are married)
35. Do women still have too heavy a burden in their day to day life?
36. Is the increasing influence of the West largely a positive or negative
thing?
37. Are you looking forward to anything in particular in Australia / UK /
USA ?
38. What do you do in your leisure time?
39. What will you do if you fail the IELTS?
ielts speaking topics / questions asked in oral speech exam
http://www.aippg.com/ielts/speaking_topics.html[12/09/2011 18:41:14]
40. Who should bear the responsibility for payment of tuition fees?
41. What can be done to improve education in rural areas?
42. Have recent changes affected your job in any way?
43. Do you agree with private education? Why?
44. What can be done to close the gap between urban and rural areas?
45. If you had the power, what changes would you carry out within
education?
46. Describe a typical working day for you
47. How do you see yourself in ten years time?
48. If you had the opportunity to change your job, what would you do
instead?
49. If you had one million dollars, what would you do with it?
50. If you could start your life again, would you do anything differently?
51. What ambitions do you have?
52. Which country/place would you most like to visit?
53. What changes do you think India will see in the next few years?
54. Will any possible future changes affect your job in any way?
55. How do you think you will cope abroad?
56. How does it feel to go abroad for the first time?
57. Are you looking forward to anything in particular in Australia / UK /
USA ?
58. What do you do in your leisure time?
59. What will you do if you fail the IELTS?
60. Why are you giveing IELTS? What course / job do you intend to
pursue after IELTS.?
This is a probable list of questions that may be asked in speaking
component of english (speech exam) Being confident as public speakers
does help a lot in the exam.

 

How to add ing in Verb?

How to add ing in Verb?

As usually ing add in continuous tense. It is common mistake to join/add ing in verb.

Sentence Structure : Subject + to be verb + (Main Verb+ing) + Object.

Example: I  am swimming in an ocean all alone.

Rules 1:

Main verb is Swim. When you see last two word One VOWEL + One Consonant, you must add extra consonant  just like: sit = sitting or (get = getting).

Easily rules: Verb ending in C.V.C means Consonant vowel Consonant

shop = shopping

stop  = stopping

Verb with more than one syllable and last syllable in Not Stressed.

Listen = Listening

visit = visiting

Happen = Happing.

Rules 2: 

One VOWEL + One Consonant in sentense. In consonant last word E then Remove E and add ing just like ( live = living), or I am coming (come = coming).

Rules 3:

Any others verb only add ing after the verb. just like playing, going etc.

 

 

 

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Tips for the Speaking test IELTS

 

IELTS – Tips for the Speaking test With thanks to Dr Vivek.

The test consists of three parts. In the first part the examiner introduces himself and asks you your name, address, interests and occupation. This part, lasting 4 to 5 minutes, is fairly simple if you are not nervous andyour conversational English is adequate.

In the second part you will be given a sheet of paper with a topic written on it. You have to speak for 2 minutes on this topic. You can’t ask for another topic. You are given 1 minute to write down your ideas. A sheet of paper and a pen are provided.

1. Make sure you read all the questions relating to the topic, written on the paper. It usually has two or three parts which you will have to talk about. Don’t miss out any question or you will lose marks.
2. Take the one minute provided to write down all the ideas you get about the topic. You lose no marks if you use up the one minute.

Two minutes can be a long time to talk solo and the notes you make will help you keep talking for the full two minutes.Once you finish your two minutes, the examiner will stop you and then ask you some questions on what you have talked about. The second part
lasts a total of 3-4 minutes.

The third part involves a discussion between you and the examiner on a topic related to what you spoke about in part 2. You will be marked on fluency, vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and ideas.

The most important thing which will help you in the speaking test is to use English in your everyday conversations. Avoid using your native language for a few weeks before the test and converse only in English. This will make you confident and you will talk fluently in the test. Watch English movies or English programmes on television to improve your
pronunciation and to expand your vocabulary.

 

 

IELTS – Tips for the Writing test

 

IELTS – Tips for the Writing test With thanks to Dr Vivek.

Actually sit and write out tasks 1 and 2 while practising (US=tice). It is very tempting to think of what you would write and not do the actual writing. You will appreciate the importance of using a structured format and avoiding being repetitive only if you practice writing. Start by reading the How to prepare for IELTS – Writing test manual at the Hong Kong City University site to familiarize yourself with the test and to get useful hints.
Task 2 carries more marks. Spend more time on it. Twenty minutes on
task 1 and 40 minutes on task 2 would be a good balance.
Since task 2 is more important, it may be a good idea to do task 2 first and
task 1 later. However, make sure you write for each task in the allotted
area since the answer sheet has separate areas designated for each task.

For both writing tasks, it is a good idea to jot down your ideas on the question sheet so that you know the outline of what you will be writing. It may take 2 or 3 minutes but the time spent is worth it.

Writing task 1 requires you to describe a graph / table / diagram in AT LEAST 150 words. I had practised on a lot of graphs but the task we had was to describe the data in a table! So practise describing all kinds of graphs / tables. See how much of your writing is 150 words. If you write less that 150 words, you lose marks. If you write more, you are likely to
make more mistakes. Try and stick to around 150 words.

For task 1, first spend some time looking at the graph / table and understanding the information given. Don’t start writing immediately. Make sure you know what each axis of the graph represents and in what units. The following structure is suggested for writing:
A sentence describing what the graph / table shows. Another sentence describing the broad / important trends shown.
Description of the data. It may not be possible to describe all the data as there may be too much data presented. Describe the relevant and most important parts. If there is more than one graph / chart, describe any comparisons or trends that can be made out.
A concluding sentence which sums up the data / trends.
Practise using a variety of phrases to avoid being repetitive. The best practice for task 2, which asks you to present an argument, is to read newspaper editorials and magazine articles on current topics. Thiswill help you develop your ideas. A suggested structure for writing is:

1. Introduce the topic and state your stand, whether you agree or
disagree.
2. Give arguments in support of your viewpoint supported by relevant
examples.
3. State the contrary viewpoint and give reasons why you don’t agree
with it.
4. Conclude with a short concluding paragraph.
5. If there is time left at the end, revise your answers and correct any
spelling or grammatical mistakes.

 

 

Tips for the Reading test

 

Tips for the Reading test

Answer all questions. There is no negative marking for incorrect answers. The reading test is considered by many to be the most difficult part of IELTS. And with some justification. You have to read 3 long sections, each with multiple paragraphs, and answer 40 questions (13 to 14 per section). Unlike the listening test, no extra time is given at the end to
transfer your answers to the answer sheet. Time can be a major constraint
since you only have an hour to finish the test.

Start by reading the How to prepare for IELTS – Reading test manual at the Hong Kong City University site to familiarize yourself with the test, the types of questions that are asked and strategies for answering them. The key to doing well in this part is practice. Read newspapers, magazines and books. Try and improve your reading skills and speed. Do the
practice tests in Cambridge IELTS 3.
The most important thing to understand is that the test does NOT assess your comprehension of the paragraphs. It does NOT test how well you have understood the passage. It tests specific skills called Scanning and Skimming.

Scanning is what one does, for example, when looking for a phone number in a directory. You know the specific information you are looking for and you go down the page quickly to find it. This technique is used when answering questions such as multiple-choice and matching. You scan the passage to quickly find the information mentioned in the question. Once you find it, you get the answer from the passage and write it against the question.

Skimming refers to reading a paragraph quickly to get an idea of what it is about, without trying to understand its details. This technique is part of the initial reading (see below). It can be modified (reading a little slower) to answer “Provide headings for the paragraphs” , “In which paragraph does this information appear in the text?” and “Author’s views” type of
questions.
The sections get progressively more difficult. Aim to spend about 15 to17 minutes on Section 1, 20 minutes on Section 2 and 23 to 25 minutes on Section 3. If possible, keep some spare time to check your answers. I would suggest ( and this is how I did it ) that you first read all the questions quickly to get an idea of what type of information is required and whether scanning or skimming (or a combination of the two) is called for. As you read the questions, use a pencil to underline important information such as dates, places and names.

Once you are through with reading all the questions, skim over the text and underline / mark important parts. If you see any information relating to the questions, mark it straight away. You may even be able to answer some questions as you read.
Answer the questions one by one with the help of the underlined parts of the text. Having read the text once, you will find it easy to find specific information by scanning.

The answers usually appear in the text in the same order as the questions. That is, the answer to question 4 will be earlier in the text than the answer to question 5. This need not always be true. It may apply to each question type rather than to all the questions taken together. The answer to MCQ 2 will appear before that to MCQ 3 and the answer to Matching question 2 will usually appear earlier than that to Matching question 3. However, the answer to MCQ 3 may appear before the answer to Matching question 2. This will not apply to questions like “In which paragraph does this information appear?” and “Yes / No / Not given”. For these question types, the information may be scattered randomly anywhere in the paragraphs.
As soon as you find an answer, write it against the question on the question paper. It is not always a good idea to try answering questions in the order in which they are asked.
Read the instructions for each question very carefully. If the question specifies that you must not use more than three words in your answer, stick to three words. The toughest questions are the True / False / Not given and Yes / No / Not given ones. Practise doing these questions till you are confident. Make sure you do not answer True / False for a Yes / No question and vice versa. Such an answer will be considered wrong and fetch no marks.
Do not get stuck on any one question. If you can’t get the answer, move on. You can always come back later.

 

 

 

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